CAST

Deborah Kerr
(Catherine de Montfaucon)

David Niven
(Philippe de Montfaucon)

Donald Pleasence
(Pere Dominic)

Edward Mulhare
(Jean-Claude Ibert)

Flora Robson
(Countess Estell)

Emlyn Williams
(Alain de Montfaucon)

Sharon Tate
(Odile)

David Hemmings
(Christian de Caray)

John Le Mesurier
(Dr. Monnet)

Michael Miller
(Grandec)

CREW

Director:
J. Lee Thompson

Screenplay:
Robin Estridge and Dennis Murphy

Based on the novel "Day of the Arrow" by:
Philip Loraine

Producers:
John Calley and Martin Ransohoff

THE CRITICS SPEAK OUT

Excellent cast in odd, low-key thriller set in France.

---LEONARD MALTIN'S MOVIE & VIDEO GUIDE

VIDEO RESOURCES

VIDEO SEARCH OF MIAMI: Membership only video service offers reproduction copies of the film in NTSC, PAL, and SECAM formats.

RELATED LINKS

DAVID NIVEN: A TRIBUTE: Tribute web site for the distinguished British actor with a biography, filmography, photos, and more.

EDWARD MULHARE OBITUARY: Obituary for the late character actor. Originally published in the May 25, 1997 edition of The Los Angeles Times.

INTERNET MOVIE DATABASE: Cast and crew information is available at this popular film database.

J. LEE THOMPSON INTERVIEW: Guido Henkel's interview with the long-time Hollywood director.

THE ORIGINAL SHARON TATE WEB SITE: Joe's loving tribute to the late screen beauty, who was tragically taken from the world too soon.


EYE OF THE DEVIL

(1967 Horror)


EYE OF THE DEVIL French poster artwork

EYE OF THE DEVIL

A review by Troy Howarth, the author of
THE HAUNTED WORLD OF MARIO BAVA

Historically speaking this film serves as an invaluable precursor to Anthony Shaffer's ingenious The Wicker Man, starring Edward Woodward and Christopher Lee. Taken on its own, however, Eye of the Devil is an effectiveDavid Niven as Philippe de Montfaucon but wildly uneven film.

The story deals with a wealthy French nobleman (David Niven) who is called back to his ancestral castle when the crops fail. Due to his erratic behavior regarding this summons, wife Deborah Kerr becomes increasingly worried about Niven's safety. Against his orders, Kerr takes her children to his ancestral castle, where she witnesses many strange and eerie religious rites. The question then becomes, will Kerr be able to rescue Niven from a ritual sacrifice, and -- indeed -- does he wish to be saved?

Owing to its erratic production history, it's not surprising that Eye of the Devil is a bit rough around the edges. The story is obtuse, and the characters under-developed, but director J. Lee Thompson employs an intriguingly arty approach that keeps one alert throughout. Thompson makes excellent use of David Hemmings and Sharon TateErnest Haller's mobile camerawork, most notably in a memorable race-against-the-clock climax. Additionally, the score is excellent, and the cast is well above average for this sort of thing. In the lead roles, Kerr and Niven are effective and restrained, but it is the supporting cast that really impresses: Donald Pleasence, his head shave completely bald, as a sinister cleric; David Hemmings as a seemingly evil youth; and especially Sharon Tate as Hemmings' enchantingly sensual/wicked sister.

In the end, Eye of the Devil cannot be considered a great film. It is, however, an above average diabolical thriller, and as such can be recommended to horror fans.

Review 2001 Troy Howarth. All Rights Reserved.
Reprinted with Mr. Howarth's permission.

PHOTO GALLERY

Pleasence as Dominic

Donald Pleasence as Pere Dominic
[Photo courtesy of Tim Murphy]

Pleasence with a sinister stare

Pleasence with a sinister stare
[Photo courtesy of Tim Murphy and Kent Burton]

Robert Duncan pays a visit to Pleasence

Robert Duncan pays a visit to Pleasence
[Photo courtesy of Tim Murphy]

Pleasence watches as Duncan kisses the amulet

Pleasence watches as Duncan kisses the amulet
[Photo courtesy of Tim Murphy]

VIDEO CLIPS

A video clip of the theatrical trailer from You Tube.com





Photos courtesy of Tim Murphy
Photos 1967 METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER / FILMWAYS PICTURES. All Rights Reserved.


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